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Even though journalists are open to publishing outside content, many media releases fail to see the light of day.

Why? It’s because they’re written and promoted with the company’s interests in mind, not the journalist’s.

Let me explain.

Journalists are employed to deliver interesting, relevant news – yet some businesses act as though their job is to deliver boring, irrelevant propaganda.

If you send a journalist a media release that’s full of boring information, don’t complain if it doesn’t get published.

If you send a journalist a media release that’s full of irrelevant information, don’t complain if it doesn’t get published.

If you send a journalist a media release that’s full of corporate propaganda, don’t complain if it doesn’t get published.

But if you send a journalist a media release that is likely to please his readers, there’s a decent chance it will get published.

One other thing: journalists often want clarifications or additional information. So make sure somebody from your business is able to promptly respond to any follow-up questions the journalist might wish to ask.

Otherwise, don’t complain if your media release doesn’t get published.

Want to know more? Click here to download a copy of our popular eBook, How to Score Free Media Coverage for Your Business.